11 of the funniest TED Talk spoofs, and what speakers can learn from them

TED Blog

RejectTED Talks. Onion Talks. DED Talks. Here in the TED office, you often hear chuckles as someone watches one of the quickly growing crop of TED spoofs floating in the ether. And surprisingly, there are some pretty good lessons for speakers embedded in these spoofs. See what I mean below.

The spoof: Stephen Colbert’s RejecTED Talks
Created by: The Late Show with Stephen Colbert
The lesson: Pudding and summer vacation sound like crowd-pleasers. But if there isn’t an idea, it isn’t a TED Talk.

Never heard of TED Talks? “Congratulations on quitting Facebook in 2005,” says Stephen Colbert at the top of this new segment, in which he opens the vault — err, cardboard box — to share rejected talks. First, a kilt-clad Angus MacDougal speaks passionately about meat and pudding, then a young Cayden R. talks about his summer vacation. The problem with both of these talks…

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About Rami Kantari

Professional Speaker and Trainer based in Dubai. Training subjects: communication skills, leadership qualities, leadership skills, customer service skills, management training courses, business training, supervisory skills, customer service training, management training programs, management training, communication skills training, leadership training, leadership courses, management courses, communications skills, team building, leadership qualities, leadership skills, presentation skills, customer service skills, management training courses, business training, result oriented, good leadership skills, course, training, leadership, supervisor course, new supervisor, supervisory skills, skills of management, customer service training, management training programs, management training, communication skills training, leadership training, management courses,
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